Last week I shadowed some of our English Teaching volunteers for two of their classes at I.E. Antonio Torres, an elementary school in Trujillo. I thought it would be cool to share some snapshots of what classrooms are like in Peru.

The most notable differences are;

1. they don’t turn on the lights, but instead rely on windows for natural lighting (which, during the mornings doesn’t seem to be that effective because it is fairly cloudy here for most of the day)

2, there are many references to how much God loves you in every room

3. the teachers don’t seem to be that concerened if their students are listening to them or learning all that much from each lesson. Here, the style of teaching is more along the lines of I’ll-write-on-the-board-and-you’ll-copy-it-into-your-notebook than anything I remember from my elementary days. 

"Whenever I visit you it’s a workout in and of itself. Whenever I come I can feel good about myself for the rest of the day."
- Melissa climbing the stairs to my 4th floor apartment

The view from my apartment at about 6:00 every evening. It’s worth the four flights of stairs.

I’m making friends in Trujillo…..

… with the waiters at the restaurants I frequent. BUT STILL. 

Last night I went to get sushi with some of the volunteers at the best sushi place in town. It happens to also be down the street from my new place. I may or may not go there about once a week. 

When I walked in, the waiter, who apparently is ALWAYS working, greeted me personally with a huge smile while gesturing towards my usual table. 

This is probably because A. I’m a gringa and B. I bring all the gringos. Two great reasons for homie to remember me. I’m feeling pretty okay about that though, because the volunteers I brought were all impressed that I “know people”.

I’m making friends in Trujillo…..

… with the waiters at the restaurants I frequent. BUT STILL.

Last night I went to get sushi with some of the volunteers at the best sushi place in town. It happens to also be down the street from my new place. I may or may not go there about once a week.

When I walked in, the waiter, who apparently is ALWAYS working, greeted me personally with a huge smile while gesturing towards my usual table.

This is probably because A. I’m a gringa and B. I bring all the gringos. Two great reasons for homie to remember me. I’m feeling pretty okay about that though, because the volunteers I brought were all impressed that I “know people”.

Joke of the day.

Today in the office one of my coworkers asked me what tri-quarterly meetings meant. This would be the worlds worst way of saying meeting once a month, right? 

viveperublog:

THANK YOU Sharon Ewing, Danielle DeLorenzo and Raymond Lee for your generous donations toward our back-to-school campaign for the kids in Sr. de los Milagros!

So far we have raised $230 toward our goal of $500! Help us get there by September 1st to provide the supplies needed for 40 children to participate in our after-school program for a whole year!

Join Sharon, Danielle and Raymond today and donate here: donatenow.networkforgood.org/viveperu

It is really incredible to have such amazing friends like Danielle who are supporting my work all the way down here in Peru! 

If you’re looking for a good cause to donate to (tax season will come again!) consider helping us reach our goal. I work with the kids these funds will go to every week, and can personally attest to the quality of our after-school program. 

Also - I made the graphics above to promote the fundraiser - although the top one didn’t come out exactly how I pictured, points for effort, right? 

A peek at a small part of what Vive Peru and our volunteers do.

viveperublog:

Yesterday, I, Ruth, shadowed two of our medical volunteers, Choua and David as they worked in their clinic in the morning. It was a fascinating morning for me to go because Choua and David were actually sent with two nurses around a local community, Alto Moche, to check each house for dengue.

image

This is a great example of the kinds of things our Clinical Medicine volunteers/we do. Read the blurb (it really is pretty short) and check out the photos to get a better picture of where and what we are working on. 

Vive Peru volunteer abroad work abroad Peru clinical medicine dengue clean water

Finally got it together enough to own: mugs, saucers, spoons, a coffee maker, beans, sugar, and milk. Thoroughly enjoying the first cup of coffee in my new place, which is perfectly timed with the rainy winter weather this morning. Details on new place and how I found it to come.

living abroad peru trujillo Peru coffee

What I did for my birthday in Peru!

There may be a saying that no one likes you when you’re 23, but in my experience that couldn’t be further from the truth. Although it is hard to be so far away from my friends and family in distance and daily experience, I also have friends and family here in Peru. All of those people add up to a lot of international lovin.

I woke up and my roommates had decorated my door, then at breakfast they had a cupcake and chocolate covered alfajor (a cookie, but so much more than just a cookie). I was very surprised and felt very lucky to be so loved. 

When I got to the office all of the staff hugged me extra tight and wished me a happy birthday, my boss Rachel & Melissa got me a voucher for a free massage which I’m very excited about. It was just one of those awesome days. 

Then, for the real festivities, I invited everyone to go out to the disco, AMA. On Thursday nights it is “ladies time” and all the ladies get free drinks until midnight. It’s the best place for dancing in Trujillo, hands down, and we had a blast. Our photo even made it up on the AMA page, oh la la. (They take photos every night, don’t worry it’s not actually that special). 

The only bummer, and the reason for the grumpy faces at the end of the night, was that BEMBOS, the big chain here, think In N Out, was closed! The injustice! We had to go elsewhere for our late night french-fry fix, but all was right in the world in the end. 

It was a great birthday.

Shout-outs to my Aunt Kath & co. for the card and treats, Grandma & Grandpa for the excellent care package, Danielle, Laura and Paul for the coolest birthday card collection I’ve ever received. The Girard’s for the skype call. My roommates in Peru for being awesome, and staff for planning the epic AMA night. Mel & Rachel for the massage, and everyone who wished me a happy birthday/made the day perfect. THANK YOU!